What is economic abuse?

Economic abuse can involve a range of behaviours. Four different ‘types’ of economic abuse have been identified (Sharp, 2008)

PREVENTING ACQUISITION OF ECONOMIC RESOURCES

Such as interfering with/sabotaging partner’s education, training and employment; insisting that partner’s wages are paid into the perpetrator’s bank account; preventing partner from claiming welfare benefits; denying partner access to personal/joint bank account.

CONTROLLING ACCESS TO/PREVENTING USE OF INDIVIDUAL/SHARED ECONOMIC RESOURCES

Such as making partner ask for money; demanding to know how money is spent; monitoring expenditure i.e. checking receipts and bank statements; keeping financial information secret; making important financial decisions without discussing them first; making partner ask to use car; threatening to throw partner out.

REFUSING TO CONTRIBUTE BY WITHHOLDING FINANCIAL SUPPORT FOR THE HOUSEHOLD

Such as refusing to contribute towards household bills and the cost of bringing up children, whilst spending own money on non-essential items.

EXPLOITING ECONOMIC RESOURCES AND/OR GENERATING ECONOMIC COSTS

Such as making partner work for personal/jointly owned business with no pay; using coercion/fraud to build up debt in partner’s name; spending money needed for bills; putting all financial liabilities in partner’s name; destroying household goods and personal items; stealing from partner’s purse.